Tag Archives: Australia

NO PRIDE IN GENOCIDE: Melbourne Invasion Day 2017

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January 26, which official marks the day of European colonisation of Australia is a national holiday sanctioned by the Australian government. For the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Australia, it is marked as Invasion Day and/or Survival Day.

In 1936, on the 150th anniversary of European colonisation, when official ceremonies were held around the country to celebrate, courageous members of the Aboriginal Community instead marked the anniversary with a Day of Mourning.  This year, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities around the country once again held Invasion Day protests and Survival Day events, with the main slogan being: NO PRIDE IN GENOCIDE. 

There was a huge turns out around the country at the protests, the biggest we have seen in many years:   In Melbourne between 10,000 – 15,000 people joined the protests (the organisers have said up to 20,000).  In Sydney, more than 8000 joined the protests and up to 3000 turned out in Brisbane in Queensland. Sizeable turn outs happened in Adelaide and other cities and town around the country.

Here is a video from the Melbourne Invasion Day protests. I have also include photos from the Melbourne rally.

Progressive not-for-profit organisations, Left media and activists are welcome to reuse the photos but please credit me as the photographer (Kim Bullimore) and link to either this blog or my other blog.

In Solidarity, Kim

 

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Melbourne Stop the War on Refugees Rally – 11 October 2014

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*Permanent protection not temporary visas
*No Cambodia Deal
*No Boat Tow Backs
*No Offshore or Onshore Detenion
*Stop the scapegoating of refugees and Muslims

Scott Morrison and Tony Abbott’s war on refugees has been going on for almost a year now – after Kevin Rudd’s PNG deal paved the way for them. The war on refugees gets uglier by the day. Reza Barati was murdered, one man was shot, one had his throat cut and two men lost their eyes, in unprovoked attacks on asylum seekers on Manus Island by those who should have been responsible for their safety. Asylum seekers have been directly returned to their persecutors in Sri Lanka. 157 Tamil asylum seekers were kept prisoner in cramped windowless berths on the high seas for a month – Morrison was only forced to acknowledge their existence and bring them to Australia because of the efforts of the refugee movement. Rates of self-harm and mental health problems in detention are skyrocketing, they approach 50% on Manus Island. Children and babies are being kept on the hell-hole of Nauru, without access to decent education. Onshore and offshore detention and deterrence is costing close to $4 billion per year. Let Abbott know he can’t revive his political fortunes in the wake of his unfair budget by kicking refugees. This cruelty must stop. Join us on the first anniversary of Operation Sovereign Borders to demand an end to detention and deterrence, and instead welcome refugees, who should have the right to work in the Australian community while their claims are assessed.

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Melbourne: Union and Community Protest against the Abbott/Hockey Federal Budget – 6 July 2014

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A selection of photos from the Melbourne July 6 Trade Union and Community Bust the Budget rally and march: An estimated 5,000 to 10,000  turned out to oppose Tony Abbott and Joe Hockey’s classwar budget attacking workers, students, pensioners and the poor.

All photos: Kim Bullimore  (click individual photos to view enlarged version)

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Aamer Rahman: How Racist is Australia? Pretty Damn Racist.

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Dear friends,

I am reblogging my friend and fellow activist, Aamer Rahman’s excellent article which was published recently by Crikey and which appears on his Tumblr.  Aamer is one of Australia’s best young political comedians.  For the last couple of years he has been performing with Nazeen Hussain, as part of Fear of a Brown Planet.  Aamer has also been a political activist since his university days, campaigning against racism and social injustice.

If you haven’t already checked out his Tumblr, you can do so by clicking here.  I have also included below the article, two short videos showcasing his political comedy, as well as Australian Story’s 2011 program on Fear of a Brown Planet.

in solidarity, Kim

How Racist is Australia? Pretty Damn Racist.

This is my response (originally published in Crikey) to Mark Sawyer’s article ‘How Racist Are You’ published in The Age and Sydney Morning Herald last week (http://www.smh.com.au/comment/how-racist-are-you-20140611-zs43h.html)

 

Dear Mark,
As a comedian I very much appreciated your satirical piece ‘How Racist Are You?’ published in The Age last week.  I think you captured the attitude and tone of Overly Defensive And Clueless White Man perfectly.  It’s actually  inspired me to write my own piece called “Hey Ladies, Pipe Down About Sexism.”

Of course, I’m being silly.  You didn’t write it as a parody piece. The truth is much more embarrassing. This is what you, and plenty of others, actually think: apparently racism is totes not a thing any more.

Being told by white people that racism is a figment of our imagination is nothing new.  I know well enough that when looking for some quality racism, the best place to start is with the guy screaming “I’m not racist!” You did not disappoint.

Thank you for the awkward list of times you didn’t challenge people’s casual racist comments.  As the kids say nowadays, cool story bro.  And maybe you’re right – there is nothing that justifies calling Australia uniquely racist. Not the specific genocide of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cultures and languages, an unparalleled migration history that banned non-white immigration here until the early 70s, or our one-of-a-kind anti-asylum regime.  These are things that happened pretty much everywhere, right?  But seriously, why let history and facts get in the way of a white guy’s Feelings About Stuff.

You’re correct, far right parties like One Nation are a thing of the past. But only because their rampant xenophobia was quickly co-opted, re-branded and shared between Labor and Liberal, making Hanson totally redundant.  In an era where our Attorney General openly defends the art of bigotry, Pauline’s services are no longer required.

You ask how many people alive are truly racist.  I don’t know the exact figures, Mark. But ask yourself if the life expectancy statistics that apply to Aboriginal people – well below the national average – would be tolerated if they applied to any other group in this country .  Ask yourself if our system of militarised  border protection and detention – recognised as exceptional the world over – would be acceptable to the Australian public if it was designed to intercept, round up and indefinitely incarcerate white people.

These things cannot exist without a sizeable population of what you refer to as ‘true racists.’ The fact that, as a nation, we accept and allow such things to happen is not an accident or the result of simple misunderstandings. They are the calculated outcomes of generations of programming.  Maybe racism is less about white people making unfortunate comments and more about systemic inequalities that have become the permanent and invisible background noise of Australian culture.  To quote you, it may pay to look at the bigger picture.

It’s 2014, champ. Racism isn’t about segregated lunch counters and people refusing to shake hands any more.  Racism is about this country’s obsession with defining boundaries of inclusion and exclusion, and the pervasive and violent ways in which those boundaries are maintained.  Racism is about two major parties collaborating for years to convince a white majority, through various codes, that they are perpetually at risk of losing out to lazy Aborigines, ghettoised migrants, dishonest asylum seekers and suspicious Muslims.  Racism is a government using free speech rhetoric to facilitate racial vilification.  Racism is, in a climate of perpetual fear and hostility, The Age choosing to publish some childish nonsense about how there’s no such thing as racism.

You’re convinced things have changed. I’m pretty confident they haven’t.

Aamer Rahman is a standup comic and writer in Melbourne.  He is currently touring his solo show The Truth Hurts in the UK and does not miss Australia.

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Aamer Rahman: Refugees

Aamer Rahman: Reverse Racism

Australian Story: Fear of A Brown Planet – 7 November 2011

Photo Essay: Victoria Trades Hall Bust the Budget rally

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A selection of photos from the June 12 Trade Union Bust the Budget rally and march: An estimated 20,000 nurses, firefighters, teachers, health workers, construction workers, electricians and many other workers turned out today to “Bust the Budget” as part of the Victoria Trades Hall initiated rally opposing the Abbott government’s class war budget attacking workers, students, pensioners and the poor.

The next trade union rally against the budget will take place nationally on July 6.

All photos: Kim Bullimore

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No Cuts, No Fees, No Corporate Universities: Student National Day of Action against the Budget

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Dear friends,

a short video I shot on 21 May of the Melbourne student protest against the attacks on education by Prime Minster, Tony Abbott and Education Minister, Christopher Pyne.  The protest which attracted between 4000-5000 students and supporters was part of a national day of action organised by the National Union of Students.

For more information the attacks on students and education, please see my earlier posts:

In solidarity,

Kim

 

Celeste Liddle on Aboriginality and racism: Fairskinned privilege? I’m sorry, but things are much more complicated than that!

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Dear friends,

I should have posted this excellent article by Aboriginal activist and writer, Celeste Liddle, up some weeks ago.  When I first read Celeste’s article on fair skinned privilege, it had me in tears.  As I wrote at the time in another forum, it is a controversial piece but Celeste deals with the issues in a very sympathetic and considered way.

As someone who is lightskinned and identifies as Aboriginal, while the whole article touched me deeply, it was especially the first half of it that brought me to tears. Here Celeste speaks about Australia’s racist policies, assimilation, the historical experiences of light skinned Aboriginals, the loss of culture and much more and the impact that this has had on our sense of identity and belonging today.

Reading Celeste’s article and the beautiful story about her brother reclaiming and speaking Arrente brought forth a whole flood of memories about my own family and the impact of Australia’s racist practices:

It made me recall, in particular, one Invasion Day – perhaps 10 or so years ago now – that year it was very painful to attend Invasion Day, it all felt very raw to me – the loss of culture and the impact of Australia’s racist policies on my family. I was so angry that year, that I wanted to scream and yell and I recall deliberately starting a fight with my partner as a way of venting my frustration.

It made me recall when I worked at Old Parliament House giving political tours and racists would say derogatory things to me during the tours about Aboriginals and the Aboriginal Tent Embassy because they thought I was white and would therefore share their own racist attitudes.

It made me recall the 2000 Olympics when similar things were said to me on a bus when we passed the temporary Aboriginal embassy that had been set up in Sydney. Again the assumption was that I was because my skin colouring is light that I was “white” and therefore would share the same racist attitudes.

It made me recall, one year visiting my family in Queensland and my youngest sister’s little friend (I think they were both maybe 9 or 10 years old) couldn’t get her head around how I could possibly be Aboriginal and that I was my sister’s sister because I was light skinned, while my mother and two sisters had darker colouring.

It made me recall the story my mother would tell that when I was a baby and she would take me to the chemist to be weighed in the small outback Queensland town we lived in and the looks she would get and her defiantly saying: “what don’t you think a black woman can have a white baby”?

It made me recall how the last time I went home to visit my family, an ignorant arse attempted to accuse my mother of “reverse racism” and when I stepped in to defend her was told that it had nothing to do with me (because clearly I was “white”).

I do not share the above experiences in order to gain sympathy but instead to highlight and agree with the argument made by Celeste in her article. I agree with Celeste when she notes that skin colour, under capitalism, does remain a racial marker and that those of us who have lighter skin colour do not experience racism in the same way as those within the Aboriginal community who have darker colouring. However, the racism is still there, it simply manifests itself in a different way.

Please take the time to read Celeste’s excellent article. If you would like to read more of Celeste’s writings, you can check out her blog “Rantings of an Aboriginal Feminist” by clicking here.

in solidarity, Kim

ps: Celeste’s article has kicked off some debate, much of which has either misinterpreted her article or ignored what she wrote.  If you would like to follow the debate, you can check out the updates on Celeste’s blog.
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Fair-skin privilege? I’m sorry, but things are much more complicated than that

celeste liddle(Photo: Celeste Liddle)

Following on from my article about why I prefer the term “black”, I encountered what I can only describe as an unexpected and actually quite upsetting response via Twitter. It was unexpected because it came from members of the migrant community; a community which, on the most part, I have experienced as strong allies. It was upsetting because no amount of explanation from an Indigenous perspective seemed to satisfy. There was a barrow to be pushed and it needed to be pushed at all costs. I write this piece not to cause division, but rather to use this opportunity to educate in the hope that the knowledge of people is expanded.

It started as an initial long Tweet that I was sent, but from there it developed into a long twitter exchange. At no point throughout this exchange did I get the sense that any of the points I had raised from an Indigenous perspective were taken on board. This long tweet, minus identification and lead-in paragraph is below:

You’ve made some comments that indicate that you regard it as ‘old fashioned’ or ‘wrong’ to use skin colour as a marker of race. However, if you deny skin colour as a marker of race, then you deny an important aspect of Blackness.

Being darker doesn’t make you more Black, but it does make you, all other things being equal, more discriminated against. To deny that is to deny your privilege: not privilege of class, education or profession, but privilege of skin colour.

There are countless different ways to be Black and not all of them are visible. But denying visibility in Blackness reminds me of whites who claim to be colour-blind. In doing so, they deny other people’s experience.

I think the reason why this means so much to me is that I have no shared culture, no shared history, no shared community or any of what you consider to be contemporary or valid Blackness. Just skin colour.

Now before I go further, it should be highlighted that my article, which was completely about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity, and which used many of our descriptive terms, our language and our experience to highlight this fact was interpreted, as was made clear in the residual tweets, to have impact for non-Indigenous communities of colour. I never set out to represent these viewpoints in my piece. I do not have the required background to represent these views from a first-hand experience. Considering that our media is dominated by white males writing about everyone else, I would much rather read those perspectives first-hand rather than silence the voices by hazarding guesses at what their views might be. Likewise, I expect that people would recognise that I am coming from the perspective of an educated Arrernte woman of the hard-left persuasion who lives in the city, recognise how rare those voices are in the media, and not contribute to the silencing. It was unfortunate that this didn’t happen.

To start with the point regarding how skin colour is a racial marker and there is a privilege associated with lighter skin, I didn’t deny this in my responses although I tried to highlight from an Indigenous perspective why the situation was more complicated. I just got walls. This was why I ended up putting a stop to the conversation. To put it simply, I don’t disagree with Dallas Scott when he highlights how skin colour seems to be associated with greater financial disadvantage, lower educational attainment and social ostracism, although I would argue that factors such as remoteness and mainstream ignorance also come into play. I’m 100% certain that skin colour was the reason why Jack Charles and Gurrumul Yunupingu were denied taxis. Their visibility is undeniable.

However, fair skin privilege from an Indigenous perspective is incredibly limited. The view expressed by the long tweet completely ignores the many assimilation practices that fairer skinned Aboriginal people have been exposed to in this country, such as the “Stolen Generations”. Children of fairer skin being ripped away from their darker parents in order to be trained up in domestic chores and farmhand duties so they could then be given to settler communities as free labour.

stolen genFair skinned children being blackened up with charcoal by the parents in the hope that the government officers would not notice their colouring. Children being belted for speaking their language and forced to abandon language, culture and family in order to avoid punishment. Living conditions so abhorrent that a dog would turn it’s nose up at them. Don’t believe me? Here is my grandmother, who was a member of the Stolen Generations, talking about the experience in her own words.  It didn’t end with my grandmother either. My father was a welfare kid who ended up with some siblings in The Convent School in Alice Springs where they were also punished severely for expressing language and culture. Recently my brother, at my father’s birthday, delivered a speech where he gave the first paragraph in Arrernte. I cannot not tell you how that felt. For two generations children in my family were denied the right to speak language because they were wards of the state and here’s my brother, at nearly 30 years old, reclaiming this language so that his siblings and his son are not also denied it. It’s for these reasons that you see so many fairer skinned Aboriginal people fighting so damn hard to reclaim language, family and culture. By virtue of skin colour many were denied these things. This is not an experience within the borders of this country that translates readily to a migrant experience.

Additionally, whilst I never denied skin colour as a marker, and whilst I also don’t deny the existence of some fair skin privilege in the some ways, what about visiting the concept of “migrant privilege”? The White Australia Policy existed until the early 1980s yet from the 1940s onwards, following the impacts of wars, it was chipped away at bit by bit. Non-white immigrants were eventually accepted into the country in various “waves” to the point of Malcolm Fraser openly supporting multiculturalism and opening up the refugee programmes to many Asian nations. This country has gone so far backward since this time with elections being won on the basis of “stopping the boats” that I am disgusted to live in it. Yet, here’s the thing: my father, despite being born in this country and having ancestors that had been born in this country for roughly 4000 generations, was not counted in the census as a citizen of this country until he was 17 years old. This is why I have problems with the term “First Australians”. Each successive wave of immigrants became Australians before the First Peoples, regardless of skin colour, were recognised as human beings. Therefore, migrant communities, whilst actively discriminated against by other Australians and enduring vast poverty, racism, ostracism and countless other things, also had more rights in this country than the First Peoples.

I state this not to be inflammatory. Rather it is a simple historical fact and one I believe that the majority of people living in this country are unaware of. They are not aware that one of the wealthiest countries in this world has third world conditions tucked away far from the visible eye. They are not aware that trachoma and other third world diseases are still an issue here. They are not aware and I am not surprised. Why? Because this country continually fails to acknowledge its own history and even goes to the extent of suppressing it by referring to the negatives as “black armband history”; therefore there is no value for national pride to revisit this stuff. Everyone who lives here benefits from stolen lands for which treaties are yet to be negotiated, massacres, frontier wars, assimilation policies and the displacement of original peoples. Including Indigenous peoples that live on lands other than homelands (yep, this would be me). Yet the broader knowledge of this is so severely lacking. Sometimes a simple acknowledgement is all that it takes to make the day of an Indigenous person struggling for recognition.

One final point, throughout the course of the tweeting, the dissenting voices referred to themselves as “Black Australians” and I feel the need to claim sovereignty here. To me this was no different than seeing Andrew Bolt referring to himself as an “indigenous Australian”. It diminishes our importance as First Peoples of this country. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are the “Black Australians”. Migrants of colour are black people who have made Australia their home and have become “Australians” therefore accepting this country as it stands: a place which was wrongfully declared Terra Nullius and was taken without the consent of the First Peoples. There is a difference. We use “black” as a way of highlighting our experiences as a result of, or in contrast to “White Australia”. The lack of general population knowledge due to national denial when it comes to our unique struggles is why I feel that this distinction is sometimes unknown and needs to be explained.

I wish to apologise to the many comrades and allies I have within the migrant communities for the existence of this blogpost. Know how much I value you, your support and your commitment to fighting side-by-side for recognition in this country. This is not a blogpost that is written for you. Rather it is written for others who, sometimes through no fault of their own, do not possess this knowledge. Who would make comments such as encountered above without realising just how limited and uneducated on the plight of First Peoples these comments are. Who accept this country as their home with a dominant power to struggle against for recognition yet fail to delve into intricacies of the experiences of First Peoples. I hope this post assists in their acquisition of knowledge.

Finally, I look very much forward to reading more about the experiences of migrant communities in this country. I want to read a hell of a lot more about the unique experiences of racism, the ostracism and the intricacies from these voices. I WANT to read about skin colour and how this manifests as a site of repression from a migrant perspective. If I had my way, the dominant white, middle-class, right-wing male voices would be sidelined in the media in favour for diversity and the sharing of true knowledges. I will never, however, be representing these voices myself in my writings. As First Peoples whose experience is almost always denied, we’ve got our own stories to tell and I am not the right person to be telling the stories of others. With respect.

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Cultural Jamming @ March in March – national protest against the Australian Abbott government

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Yesterday, I joined over 100,000 people around Australia to March in March and oppose the policies of the Australian Prime Minister, Tony Abbott and the Liberal (conservative) Australian government.  All around Australia – over the weekend of March 15-17,  in the capital cities and in regional areas, Australian voters and their families took to the streets to say they had “no confidence” in the Abbott government.

In Melbourne, 50,000 people joined the demonstration; in Sydney 20,ooo; in Adelaide 5,ooo,  in Perth 2,000 and in Brisbane 15,000.  Thousands of people also took to the streets over the weekend in regional centres such as Gosford, Wollongong, Townsville, Cairns, Newcastle, Port Macquarie, Katoomba, as well as countless other towns around the country.

As the March in March Melbourne event listing noted: “This signifies the people’s vote of no confidence in policies of the government that go against common principles of humanity, decency, fairness social justice and equity, democratic governance, responsible global citizenship and conserving our natural heritage”.

At the Melbourne March in March, as with the other March in March demonstrations in other towns in cities, people carried placards on a range of issues. Protestors opposed Abbott’s policies on refugees, the environment, climate change, worker’s rights, Indigenous issues, women’s rights and much much more.

While I find most, if not all of Abbott’s policies aborhent, I am most appalled by his draconian policies on asylum seekers and refugees which has seen some of the most vulnerable people in the world, who are escaping trauma, persecution, poverty, war and starvation being locked up in hell holes as a part of Abbott’s off shore processing policy (which was initially started by the Rudd Labor government). This policy recently resulted in the murder of a young Iranian refugee, Reza Barati, on Manus Island.

Shamefully, the Australian Labor Party distanced itself from yesterday’s rally – no doubt because many of the issues people were protesting are also policies pursued by the ALP.  According to the ABC: “The Labor Party has distanced itself from the rally, with Opposition Leader Bill Shorten telling reporters, ”But I do get that people want to express their views. It’s a free country,” he said”.

Tony Abbott showed his contempt for the Australian pubic and voters by flippantly dismissing the protests. According to the ABC: “Prime Minister Tony Abbott was asked about the protests taking place in Australia’s capital cities today, but replied that, “My understanding is that the only big rally in Sydney is the St Patrick’s Day parade. That is the big event in Sydney today. I wish all of them well. If their parade is rained on, there is always some Guinness available around the city.”

I have included some images of some of the placards below. In particular, I have included some of my favourite cultural jamming ones, with pop culture references.  I have also include along with some of my photos from the Melbourne rally and other placards referencing the issues people were protesting about.  Also below is a video of  the 50,000 strong Melbourne rally.

The very last photo I have included is of the fabulous Year 9 students from Newtown Performing Arts High School in Sydney. Earlier in the week they became a viral hit when a video of their encounter with Prime Minister Tony Abbott was uploaded onto youtube.  In the video “Tony Abbott avoids and waffles himself through questions regarding gay marriage, asylum seekers and feminine [feminist] leadership asked by year 9 students from Newtown High School of the Performing Arts Students”.  I have included their video as well.

 

Culture Jamming Abbott’s policies at March in March
Photos: Sherlock (Newcastle); Joffrey (Melbourne); Wrecking Ball (unknown); Tinman/Wizard of Oz (Brisbane); Superman (Melbourne); Simpsons (Melbourne)

   sherlock - march in march newcastle   joff wrecking ball - abbott  tinman superman was a refugee - march in march Simpons - melb

Not happy Tony!
Photos: 1. Katoomba, 2 Melbourne, 3 Cairns, 4 to 9 Melbourne, 10  unknown, 11 Brisbane, 12 Hobart, 13 Brisbane, 14 Sydney
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Running Man in Australia

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Like most other die-hard fans of Running Man, I was very excited to hear that my favourite Korean variety show would be coming to film some episodes in Australia.   Running Man is a Korean reality “action variety” show in which individuals and teams compete against each other in a variety of missions.  The show 70-80% unscripted, which allows for a lot of fun. Running Man has 7 permanent cast members, with the cast being made up of comedians, singers, actors and other entertainers.

cast shotCast L to R:  Lee Kwangsoo, Kim Jong Kook, Yoo Jae-suk, Song Jihyo,
Song Jong-ki (former cast member), Ji Suk-jin, HaHa (Ha Dong-hoon) and Gary (Kang Hee-gun)

The show regularly hosts celebrity guests who also participate in the various missions. The highlight of the show is often the signature ‘Race Mission’ where individuals have to remove each other’s tags to become the winner.

The cast and crew are shooting in Australia this week, with the episodes screening on the 9th and 16th March.

The turn out of fans has been overwhelming and at times a little crazy.  Here are some of the fan photos and videos (*my apologies for not being able to provide photo credits with all the photos.  So many of the photos have been retweeted/shared with out credits and I have not been able to locate the original source).

airport beach brisbane airport  collins st haha goldcoast Jihyo Jongkook - roo kangaroos -inmyownmind1 kjk state lib entry kjk state library kwangsoo airport kwangsoo ripponlea @KSDC from IG -AllForKwangSo kwangsoo woobin Eric Chang library - cre4msoda rain jihyo motnapat ig ripponla  ripponlea collage runningman collective airport runninmancast woobin John Smith @jphamnguyen

Arrival in Australia at Brisbane airport.

Fans mob Running Man in Melbourne