Tag Archives: music

Game of Thrones: spoofs, parodies and covers

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Game of Thrones Theme New Orleans Jazz Cover – Swamp Donkeys at BB King’s

 

The Pugs of Westeros


Let it Go(T) – The Game of Thrones/Frozen Mashup Crossover

 

Game of Thrones Brady Bunch makeover – Wil Wheaton

 

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And now for some Japanese fusion!

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The Wagakki Band fuse traditional Japanese instruments with contemporary rock and punk.  Instruments include  tsugaru-shamisen (Japanese lute), a koto (Japanese harp), a shakuhachi (Japanese flute), a taiko drummer and contemporary rock instruments.

 

Rin’ combines traditional Japanese musical instruments with modern pop and rock.

 

BabyMetal is “kawaii metal” (“cute metal”) – a fusion of J-pop idol music and heavy metal.

 

Keisho Ohno plays Japanese fusion jazz with tsugaru-shamisen

Boots Riley and the Music of Dissent and Rebellion

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Over Easter weekend, more than 1100 people attended the Marxism2014 in Melbourne.  One of the highlights of the conference was the Saturday evening performance by activist and radical musician, Boots Riley, who also spoke on race and racism in the USA earlier in the day.  Riley hopes to be touring Australia later in the year with his band, The Coup and you can check out some of their tracks below, as well as an interview with Boots on building the radical movements for change in the USA.

As the Marxism 2014 website notes, Boots Riley is one of the most influential radical American musicians of the past two decades. The critical acclaim that has greeted his musical endeavours, in particular his role as front-man of legendary US hip-hop outfit The Coup, has only been matched by the vitriol with which his work has been greeted by conservatives.

Since forming in 1990, The Coup have released a total of 6 albums, with their unique combination of funky rhythms and lyrics that move from cheeky wit to the hardest of hard-hitting political critique providing inspiration (and enjoyment) for a generation of radicals around the world. Their music has been widely acclaimed, with their 1998 release ‘Steal this Album’ labeled a masterpiece by Rolling Stone magazine, and other albums regularly appearing in ‘top 10 albums of the year’ lists in Rolling Stone and other major music publications.

Boots Riley has rapped with Tupac, produced a score for an episode of The Simpsons, had a novel written based on the lyrics of one of his songs, and, perhaps most impressively of all, had his work dismissed by Fox News as “a stomach-turning example of anti-Americanism disguised as highbrow intellectual expression.”

Riley has never been shy of controversy. Following the 9-11 attacks in New York, The Coup famously put out a press release stating that “last week’s events were symptomatic of a larger backlash against U.S. corporate imperialism.” Statements such as this, as well as the lyrics of songs such as ‘5 Million Ways to Kill a CEO’, have made him a favourite target of the conservatives. His influence on radical culture and politics in the US cannot be denied. In 2003 he was even named, by Vibe Magazine, as one of the 10 most influential people of the year. Nevertheless, the fame he has achieved through his music hasn’t led him away from direct involvement with political struggles and movements on the ground.

Riley was born into a family of radicals and has never wavered from his commitment to revolutionary politics and practice. He has been involved in many campaigns for social justice in his local community in Oakland, California, recently playing a leading role in the Occupy movement in the city.

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Abby Martin interviews ‘Boots’ Riley, about his musical roots, the state of dissent in the US and the corporatisation of America.

 

Boots Riley and The Coup:

The Guillotine

My Favourite Mutiny

The Magic Clap

 

 

AC/DC’s Thunderstruck on Cello

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Luka Sulic and Stjepan Hauser of 2CELLOS release their cover of  “Thunderstruck” by legendary Australian band, AC/DC.  2CELLOS are Baroque-style musicians who interpret modern and Baroque music.  The costumes for the video were provided by  the Friends of Giostra Society in Croatia.

 

AC/DC with the original “Thunderstruck”

K-Drama Review: Shut Up and Run! (aka Shut Up! Flower Boy Band)

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IB_S_BASIC_COPYRIGHT =

  • English title: Shut Up! Flower Boy Band
  • Alternative English title: Shut Up and Run!/ Shut Up and Let’s Go!
  • Revised romanization: Dagchigo Kkochminambaendeu
  • Hangul: 닥치고 꽃미남밴드
  • Year Released: 2012
  • Episodes: 16
  • Director: Lee Kwon
  • Writer: Seo Yoon-Hee
Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Sung Joon.jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-L (Kim Myung-Soo).jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Lee Hyun-Jae.jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Yoo Min-Kyu.jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Kim Min-Suk.jpg
Sung Joon L (Kim Myung-Soo) Lee Hyun-Jae Yoo Min-Kyu Kim Min-Suk
Kwon Ji-Hyuk Lee Hyun-Soo Jang Do-Il Kim Ha-Jin Seo Kyung-Jong
(leader and vocals) (guitar) (drums) (bass) (keyboard)
Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Jung Eui-Chul.jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Jo Bo-Ah.jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Kim Ye-Rim.jpg Shut Up Flower Boy Band-Lee Min-Ki.jpg
Jung Eui-Chul Jo Bo-Ah Kim Ye-Rim Lee Min-Ki
Yoo Seung-Hoon Im Soo-Ah Ye-Rim Joo Byung-Hee

A coming-of-age story about an underground high school rock band called, “Eye Candy”, which explores the friendship and rivalry between six “deliquent” working class boys who make up the band. Made up of band leader, charismatic, free-spirited vocalist Joo Byung-hee (Lee Min-ki); his best friend Kwon Ji-hyuk (Sung Joon), the guitarist with the band; quiet and serious drummer, Jang Do-il (Lee Hyun-jae);  cassanova bass player, Kim Ha-jin (Yoo Min-kyu) and loyal keyboardist, Seo Kyung-jong (Kim Min-suk).

In the aftermath of Joo Byung-hee’s death (at the end of episode 2), the rest of the band try to come to grips with the death of their friend and begin a journey to not only honour his memory and legacy but also – unbeknown to them – also a journey of self-discovery about themselves. The drama is atypical of normal “music dramas”, with the focus actually being more on the journey of the friends, rather than the music itself.

I had not expected to end up loving this drama. I decided only to watch it because I had watched TVN’s other two “Flower Boy” dramas and because I liked Lee Min-ki as an actor and had enjoyed watching Sung Joon in Gu Family Book and wanted to check out more of his work. The drama surprised me with not only its wonderfully down to earth scripts but also characters, who were not your usual cardboard cuts outs that are often found in drama shows (both in Korea and internationally). Over all, the vast majority of the characters, both the lead and supporting, were nuanced, layered and really wonderful to watch.

While Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flowerboy Band  displays many of the standard kdrama tropes, it delves into them in an atypical way, bringing a freshness to many a tired trope and plot twist.  This can be seen for example, in the way the drama deals with the standard triangle relationships often found in kdramas. In Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flower Boy Band, there are two triangle relationships, one between Ji-hyuk, Su-ah and Seung-hoon and one between Ji-hug, Su-ah and the deceased Bung-hee. It’s the second of these two, which is the real triangle relationship that needs to be overcome. And while the focus of most k-drama loves stories are the two lead characters in Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flowerboy Band , the central love story in this drama is not the love story between the lead male and female characters, Ji-hyuk and Su-ha but between the boys in the band. It is a love story about their friendship, loyalty and dedication to each other.

One of the standard tropes used in kdramas is class conflict, between working class and wealthy elite characters. What I loved about Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flowerboy Band  was that it actually treated the class back ground of the boys in the band as something genuine and as something that shaped their world view and actions. Often a nod is given to this in dramas, but then its ignored. With this particular series, it was a constant presence in the drama, one which wasn’t dealt with lightly or with little regard or treated as a mere plot or comedic device.

The other thing I loved about Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flowerboy Band  was its depiction of the female characters. Far to often in kdramas (and non-kdramas) the women characters are frustrating – often portrayed as weak and/or meek and/or shrill and/or mean and/or just there to prop up the male lead’s ego or to pander to his every whim. They often lack any real separate identity, depth or agency, which is annoying and frustrating.  What is outstanding about Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flowerboy Band , is that on the whole most of the female characters in this drama are realistic, have a strong identity of their own, separate from the male lead characters and have agency in spades. While some of the supporting female characters can be criticised on some levels, on the whole even they, along with the main female characters, are strong willed with a backbone and minds of their own. They are not cardboard cuts out and are shown to be independent and capable.

While I enjoyed all three of TVN’s “Flowerboy” shows, this was probably the one I enjoyed most.  It stood out because not only did the series circumvent and recreate in its own image many of the standard k-drama tropes but because it was not your standard love story.  And it was the atypical love story about the boys, their friendship, loyalty and dedication to each other which gave depth and heart to Shut Up and Run!/Shut Up! Flowerboy Band

Two uplifting flash mobs from Spain

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In Janurary 2014, the Carne Cruda 2.0, a program on the leading Cadena SER Spanish Network Radio station organised a flashmob of a small orchestra and singer  to cheer people looking for work at an unemployment office in Madrid, Spain.

The Guardian newspaper notes: Currently Spain is enduring an unprecedented economic crisis caused by a property crash and public debt crisis. Unemployment, already at 26%, is expected to grow. Spain lost around 800,000 jobs last year and more than half of under-25s are unemployed. The Spanish government has resorted to severe budget cuts to reduce its deficit but austerity measures have also depressed the economy.

Oxfam says that previous crises in Latin America and Asia point to serious long-term damage if government austerity measures remain in place. “Poverty and social exclusion may increase drastically,” it says. “By 2022, some 18 million Spaniards, or 38% of the population, could be in poverty.”

 

Ode to Joy Orchestral Flashmob organised by Banco Sabadell on its 130th anniversary.  The flashmob inclued 100 people from the Vallès Symphony Orchestra, the Lieder, Amics de l’Òpera and Coral Belles Arts choirs.