Tag Archives: protests

NO PRIDE IN GENOCIDE: Melbourne Invasion Day 2017

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January 26, which official marks the day of European colonisation of Australia is a national holiday sanctioned by the Australian government. For the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community of Australia, it is marked as Invasion Day and/or Survival Day.

In 1936, on the 150th anniversary of European colonisation, when official ceremonies were held around the country to celebrate, courageous members of the Aboriginal Community instead marked the anniversary with a Day of Mourning.  This year, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities around the country once again held Invasion Day protests and Survival Day events, with the main slogan being: NO PRIDE IN GENOCIDE. 

There was a huge turns out around the country at the protests, the biggest we have seen in many years:   In Melbourne between 10,000 – 15,000 people joined the protests (the organisers have said up to 20,000).  In Sydney, more than 8000 joined the protests and up to 3000 turned out in Brisbane in Queensland. Sizeable turn outs happened in Adelaide and other cities and town around the country.

Here is a video from the Melbourne Invasion Day protests. I have also include photos from the Melbourne rally.

Progressive not-for-profit organisations, Left media and activists are welcome to reuse the photos but please credit me as the photographer (Kim Bullimore) and link to either this blog or my other blog.

In Solidarity, Kim

 

FIFA World Cup 2014 Protests: Money for housing, schools and health; not for stadiums, state repression and corruption

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The FIFA World Cup starts on Friday in Brazil.  In the lead up to the competition, hundreds of thousands of Brazilians have taken to the street to protest the government’s spending of billions of dollars on stadiums and venues to host the event,  while failing to spend money on health care, schooling and housing for the poor.  Protesters have also been demonstrating against the forced removal of more than 250,00 people from their homes, as well as the “hygienisation” (or forced expulsion) of the homeless and the millions spent on arming the police in order for them to attack ordinary Brazilians who protest the FIFA world cup and government.

The Brazilian government has sought to introduce new “terrorism” laws which criminalise the right to protest. Amnesty International has warned that this is little more than a crack down on free speech and freedom of expression.

Despite severe police and state repression against protests in May, protesters have vowed to continue their protests.  Worker are also planning to launch a series of strikes during the World Cup.

For more information on the protests against the World Cup, you can check out the website of the Popular Committee Against the Cup, which includes a protest manifesto and other information on why the people of Brazil are protesting.  To access the website,  please click here.

 

15 mayInternational Day Against the World Cup, May 15 (text of flyer)

Which is and will be the legacy of the 2014 soccer world cup?

  • 9 deaths during the renovation of / in the soccer arenas of the world cup and 3 deaths in arenas which follow the same standards;
  • 250.000 people forcefully removed from their homes;
  • Street vendors and independent artists who are forbidden to work;
  • Women, children and adolescents who suffer from sexual exploitation;
  • Homeless people who suffer violence and ”hygienisation” (are expelled from the downtown area);
  • Private corporations taking care of public space and streets;
  • Elitisation of the soccer stadiums;
  • Billions invested in armament of the police to use against the people;
  • Laws declaring state of emergency and criminalising demonstrations;
  • And an immense and questionable public debt the people will have to pay.

For this legacy, we hold responsible the corporations sponsoring the FIFA world cup, the construction companies, the mafias FIFA and CBF (Brazilian soccer federation), the municipal, state and federal governments, as well as the legislative and judicial branches!

What do we demand?

  • A decent home for all persons removed from their homes! Key for key!
  • End of the violence of the state and of the “hygienisation” in the downtown area!
  • Immediate revocation of FIFA’s “exclusive areas”, laid down in the “general law for the world cup” and permission for street workers to sell in these areas!
  • Creation of campaigns to fight sexual exploitation and human trafficking!
  • Non – installment of the special courts of FIFA!
  • Revocation of the law that grants general tax exemption to FIFA and its business partners!
  • Immediate stop to all bills and norms that define the crime of terrorism, that serve to criminalise social movements and increase violence against the young and black population!
  • Demilitarisation of the police and end of the repression of social movements!

We demand our “right to the city” and our right to protest!

WORLD CUP WITHOUT THE PEOPLE – WE’RE BACK ON THE STREET!

#15M – #DayAgainstWorldCup

 

May 15 international day of resistance against the World Cup in Brazil. Report by Euronews.

Teachers, civil servants, bus drivers and the homeless demands housing and medical care not stadiums. Report by Euronews.

Indigenous Brazilian protest World Cup.  Report by Euronews.

 

Protest graffiti highlighting money spent on the World Cup at the expense of the poor, homeless and indigenous population of Brazil

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South Korea: Anger continues over ferry tragedy

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Dear friends,

please find below my follow up article published by Red Flag at the continuing and growing protests in the wake of the Sewol tragedy against the Park Geun-hye government.  Since this article was first written and was published, there has been a second weekend of mass protests with 30,000 turning out once again to protest government authorities and crony capitalism.  As with the first mass protest/vigil of 30,000 mentioned in my article, the second mass protest which also attracted more than 39,000, several hundred protestors were arrested, including trade union leaders.

in solidarity,
Kim

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Korean-ferry protestsMore than 30,000 South Koreans joined a candlelight protest on 17 May to demand that the right wing Park Geun-hye government take responsibility for the Sewol ferry disaster.

 

The Sewol capsized on 16 April with 476 people on board. However, due to a botched rescue attempt by government authorities, only 170 people survived.

One month after the tragedy, public anger has continued to grow as corruption within the shipping industry has gained broader public attention.

The protest was the latest in a series of demonstrations that have taken place since late April and was just one of several anti-government protests. More than 200 people were arrested at various events over the weekend.

On Saturday afternoon more than 6,000 teachers held their own action. The teachers, members of the Korean Teachers and Education Workers Union, demanded an independent investigation.

One teacher told the Korean Herald: “Park’s excessive focus on deregulation was why the entrepreneurs paid no attention to the pricey safety measures. The president is using her unparalleled powers to protect the large corporations’ profits, not the lives of citizens.”

Two days earlier, on 15 May, more than 15,000 teachers released a statement critical of Park and her government. In response, the Education Ministry threatened disciplinary action, accusing teachers of violating laws that prohibit collective action unrelated to their jobs.

The threats come on the back of the ministry ordering education offices around the country to identify and take action against 43 teachers who posted messages on the Presidential Office website. They called on Park to step down and accused the government of trying to censor the media in order to prevent critical reports.

Former newsroom chief Kim Si-gon of KBS, one of South Korea’s three main television broadcasters, has also publicly accused the Presidential Office of attempting to prevent critical reports being aired about the bungled rescue.

According to Kim, KBS president Gil Hwan-young had ordered reporters not to be too critical in their reporting, citing orders from the Blue House (the executive office and residence of the president).

On 19 May, journalists from the network staged a one-day strike denouncing the interference.